Houses of Pickhurst

HOUSES OF PICKHURST ACADEMY

House System

On entry the children are allocated one of four “houses”.  These are Chatham (red), Rochester (blue), Sydney (yellow) and Wolfe (green).  Children collect house points for good work and the house that collects the most house points at the end of the week is announced at Monday’s celebration assembly.

Children in year 6 are voted to become house captains.  The house captains for 2016-17 are:

Chatham:  Oliver B & Isadora Y
Rochester:  Adams H & Jessica R
Sydney:  Edward S & Lauren H
Wolfe:  Ben T & Lola L

 

Houses of Pickhurst Academy are named after famous historical figures from the restoration to eighteenth century.

 

Rochester House colour- Blue

John Wilmot, 2nd Earl of Rochester (1 April 1647 – 26 July 1680), was an English poet and courtier of King Charles II’s Restoration court. The Restoration reacted against the “spiritual authoritarianism” of the Puritan era. Rochester was the embodiment of the new era, and he is as well known for his rakish lifestyle as his poetry, although the two were often interlinked. In 1669 he committed treason by boxing the ears of Thomas Killigrew in sight of the monarch, and in 1673 he accidentally delivered an insulting diatribe to the King. He died at the age of 33.

Rochester’s contemporary Andrew Marvell described him as “the best English satirist”, and he is generally considered to be the most considerable poet and the most learned among the Restoration wits. His poetry, much of it censored during the Victorian era, enjoyed a revival from the 1920s onwards, with notable champions including Graham Greene and Ezra Pound.The critic Vivian de Sola Pinto linked Rochester’s libertinism to Hobbesian materialism. During his lifetime, he was best known for A Satyr Against Reason and Mankind, and it remains among his best known works today.

Sydney House colour- Yellow

Thomas Townshend, 1st Viscount Sydney (24 February 1733 – 30 June 1800), was a British politician who held several important Cabinet posts in the second half of the 18th century. His most enduring legacy is probably that the cities of Sydney in Nova Scotia, Canada, and Sydney in New South Wales, Australia are named in his honour, in 1785 and 1788 respectively.

Wolfe House colour- Green

Major General James Wolfe (2 January 1727 – 13 September 1759) was a British Army officer, known for his training reforms but remembered chiefly for his victory over the French at the Battle of Quebec in Canada in 1759. The son of a distinguished general, Lieutenant-General Edward Wolfe, he had received his first commission at a young age and saw extensive service in Europe where he fought during the War of the Austrian Succession. His service in Flanders and in Scotland, where he took part in the suppression of the Jacobite Rebellion, brought him to the attention of his superiors. The advancement of his career was halted by the Peace Treaty of 1748 and he spent much of the next eight years on garrison duty in the Scottish Highlands. Already a brigade major at the age of eighteen, he was a lieutenant-colonel by the age of twenty-three.

The outbreak of the Seven Years’ War in 1756 offered Wolfe fresh opportunities for advancement. His part in the aborted raid on Rochefort in 1757 led William Pitt to appoint him second-in-command of an expedition to capture the Fortress of Louisbourg. Following the success of the Siege of Louisbourg he was made commander of a force which sailed up the Saint Lawrence River to capture Quebec City. After a lengthy siege Wolfe defeated a French force under Louis-Joseph de Montcalm allowing British forces to capture the city. At 23 years of age Wolfe was killed at the height of the Battle of the Plains of Abraham due to injuries from three musket balls.

Wolfe’s part in the taking of Quebec in 1759 earned him posthumous fame, and he became an icon of Britain’s victory in the Seven Years War and subsequent territorial expansion. He was depicted in the painting The Death of General Wolfe, which became famous around the world. Wolfe was posthumously dubbed “The Hero of Quebec”, “The Conqueror of Quebec”, and also “The Conqueror of Canada”, since the capture of Quebec led directly to the capture of Montreal, ending French control of the country. There is a statue of him on Westerham Green, Kent.

Chatham House colour- Red

William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham (15 November 1708 – 11 May 1778) was a British Whig statesman who led the government of Great Britain during the Seven Years’ War (known as the French and Indian War in North America). He again led the ministry, holding the official title of Lord Privy Seal, between 1766 and 1768. Much of his power came from his brilliant oratory. He was out of power for most of his career and became famous for his attacks on the government, such as those on Walpole’s corruption in the 1730s, Hanoverian subsidies in the 1740s, peace with France in the 1760s, and the uncompromising policy towards the American colonies in the 1770s.

Pitt is best known as the wartime political leader of Britain in the Seven Years’ War, especially for his single-minded devotion to victory over France, a victory which ultimately solidified Britain’s dominance over world affairs. He is also known for his popular appeal, his opposition to corruption in government, his support for the colonial position in the run-up to the American War of Independence, his advocacy of British greatness, expansionism and colonialism, and his antagonism toward Britain’s chief enemies and rivals for colonial power, Spain and France.Peters argues his statesmanship was based on a clear, consistent, and distinct appreciation of the value of the Empire.

Thomas (2003) argues that Pitt’s power was based not on his family connections but his extraordinary parliamentary skills by which he dominated the House of Commons. He displayed a commanding manner, brilliant rhetoric, and sharp debating skills that cleverly utilized broad literary and historical knowledge.

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